Submission Guidelines

Submitting an Article Online

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Article Types

Articles

Research articles must describe the outcomes and application of unpublished original research. These should make a substantial contribution to knowledge and understanding in the subject matter and should be supported by relevant figures and tabulated data. Research articles should be no more than 8,000 words in length.

This section is peer reviewed.

Reviews

Reviews can cover topics such as current controversies or the historical development of studies as well as issues of regional or temporal focus. Papers should critically engage with the relevant body of extant literature. Review articles should be no longer than 3,000 words in length.

Author Guidelines

Submissions should be made electronically through this website. Once submitted, the author can track the submission and communicate with the editors via the online journal management system.

Please ensure that you consider the following guidelines when preparing your manuscript. Failure to do so may delay the processing of your submission.

Once a submission has been completed, the submitting author is able to fully track the status of the paper and complete requested revisions via their online profile.

All word limits include referencing and citation.

 

Structure

Title page
To ensure blind peer review, please only list the title and abstract on the submitted manuscript file.

The names of all authors, affiliations, contact details, biography (optional) and the corresponding author details must be completed online as part of the submission process.

Author names should include a forename and a surname. Forenames cannot include only initials.

  • J. Bloggs is not preferred. The full name, Joe Bloggs is required (this will enhance the 'findability' of your publication)

The affiliation should ideally include ‘Department, Institution, City, Country’, however only the Institution and Country are mandatory.

Abstract
Research articles must have the main text prefaced by an abstract of no more than 250 words summarising the main arguments and conclusions of the article. This must have the heading ‘Abstract’ and be easily identified from the start of the main text.

A list of up to six key words may be placed below the abstract (optional).

The Abstract and Keywords should also be added to the metadata when making the initial online submission.

Main text
The body of the submission should be structured in a logical and easy to follow manner.

Ethics and consent (if applicable)
Research involving human subjects, human material, or human data, must have been performed in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki. Where applicable, studies must have been approved by an appropriate ethics committee and the authors should include a statement within the article text detailing this approval, including the name of the ethics committee and reference number of the approval. The identity of the research subject(s) should be anonymised whenever possible. For research involving human subjects, informed consent to participate in the study must be obtained from participants (or their legal guardian).

Experiments using animals must follow national standards of care. For further information, click here.

References
All references cited within the submission must be listed at the end of the main text file.

 

Language & Text

Capitalisation
For the submission title:

Capitalise all nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs and subordinate conjunctions (i.e. as, because, although). Use lowercase for all articles, coordinate conjunctions and prepositions.

  • Slip-Sliding on a Yellow Brick Road: Stabilization Efforts in Afghanistan

Headings within the main text:

First level headings in the text should follow the same rule as the main title.

For lower-level subheadings, only capitalise first letter and proper nouns.

Headings should be under 75 characters.

Spelling
Submissions must be made in English. Authors are welcome to use American or British spellings as long as they are used consistently throughout the whole of the submission.

  • Colour (UK) vs. Color (US)

When referring to proper nouns and normal institutional titles, the official, original spelling must be used.

  • World Health Organization, not World Health Organisation

Grammar
American or English grammar rules may be used as long as they are used consistently and match the spelling format (see above).  Use the Oxford comma: “Hemingway had a particular affection for gin, vermouth, and dry martinis.”

 

Font
Submissions to Affirmations: Of the Modern should be formatted in 12-point Timmes New Roman.

Underlined text should be avoided whenever possible.

Bold or italicised text to emphasise a point are permitted, although should be restricted to minimal occurrences to maximise their efficiency.

Lists
Use bullet points to denote a list without hierarchy or order of value. If the list indicates a specific sequence then a numbered list must be used.

Lists should be used sparingly to maximise their impact.

Quotation marks
Use double quotation marks except for quotes within another speech, in which case single quotation marks are used.

Commas and full stops should be included within quotation marks.

Punctuation that follows an italicized title should be in roman type, rather than italics.

Quotations that are longer than three lines in length must be in an indented paragraph separate from the main text.

The standard, non-italicised font must be used for all quotes.

It must be clear from the text and/or citation where the quote is sourced. If quoting from material that is under copyright then permission will need to be obtained from the copyright holder.

Acronyms & Abbreviations
With abbreviations, the crucial goal is to ensure that the reader – particularly one who may not be fully familiar with the topic or context being addressed – is able to follow along. Spell out almost all acronyms on first use, indicating the acronym in parentheses immediately thereafter. Use the acronym for all subsequent references.

  • Research completed by the World Health Organization (WHO) shows …

A number of abbreviations are so common that they do not require the full text on the first instance. Examples of these can be found here.

Abbreviations should usually be in capital letters without full stops.

  • USA, not U.S.A

Common examples from Latin origin do not follow this rule and should be lower case and can include full stops.

  • e.g., i.e., etc.

Use of footnotes/endnotes
Notes should appear as footnotes, numbered with Arabic numerals. (There is no need for a bibliography or list of works cited.) Use footnotes rather than endnotes. These will appear at the foot of each page.

Notes should be used for purposes of referencing, and where helpful clarifying information needs to be conveyed.

Citations should as a general rule conform to the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edn (2010). Avoid “ibid.” and “op. cit.” if possible. Parenthetical citations for texts referred to frequently can be helpful.

Please insert the footnote marker after the end punctuation.

Additional style guide
Paragraphs should be double-spaced, justified, begin with neither an indent nor a tab, and be separated by a single blank line. Block quotations should be in the same font, indented from the left margin only.

All singular nouns should form possessives with an apostrophe and an s: Marx’s, Descartes’s, Jesus’s, Euripides’s.

Interpolations should be framed by square brackets, as should ellipses used to indicate that text has been omitted: “April is the cruellest month, […] mixing / Memory and desire.”

 
 

Data & Symbols

Symbols
Symbols are permitted within the main text as long as they are commonly in use or have explanatory definition on their first usage.

Hyphenation, em and en dashes
There is no set rule on the use of hyphenation between words, as long as they are consistently used.

Em dashes should be used sparingly. If they are present, they should denote emphasis, change of thought or interruption to the main sentence and can replace commas, parentheses, colons or semicolons.

  • The president’s niece—daughter of his younger brother—caused a media scandal when…

En dashes can be used to replace ‘to’ when indicating a range. No space should surround the dash.

  • 10-25 years
  • pp. 10-65

Numbers
For numbers zero to nine please spell the whole words. Please use figures for numbers 10 or higher.

We are happy for authors to use either words or figures to represent large whole figures (i.e. one million or 1,000,000) as long as the usage is consistent throughout the text.

If the sentence includes a series of numbers then figures must be used in each instance.

  • Artefacts were found at depths of 5, 9, and 29 cm.

If the number appears as part of a dataset, in conjunction with a symbol or as part of a table then the figure must be used.

  • This study confirmed that 5% of…

If a sentence starts with a number it must be spelt, or the sentence should be re-written so that it no longer starts with the number.

  • Fifteen examples were found to exist…
  • The result showed that 15 examples existed…

Do not use a comma for a decimal place.

  • 2.43 NOT 2,43

Numbers that are less than zero must have ‘0’ precede the decimal point.

  • 0.24 NOT .24

Units of measurement
Symbols following a figure to denote a unit of measurement must be taken from the latest SI brochure. See http://www.bipm.org/utils/common/pdf/si_brochure_8_en.pdf for the full brochure.

Formula
Formulae must be proofed carefully by the author. Editors will not edit formulae. If special software has been used to create formulae, the way it is laid out is the way they will appear in the publication.

 

Figures & Tables

Figures
Figures, including graphs and diagrams, must be professionally and clearly presented. If a figure is not easy to understand or does not appear to be of a suitable quality, the editor may ask to re-render or omit it.

All figures must be cited within the main text, in consecutive order using Arabic numerals (e.g. Figure 1, Figure 2, etc.).

Each figure must have an accompanying descriptive main title. This should clearly and concisely summarise the content and/or use of the figure image. A short additional figure legend is optional to offer a further description.

  • Figure 1: 1685 map of London.
  • Figure 1: 1685 map of London. Note the addition of St Paul’s Cathedral, absent from earlier maps.

Figure titles and legends should be placed within the text document, either after the paragraph of their first citation, or as a list after the references.

The source of the image should be included, along with any relevant copyright information and a statement of authorisation (if needed).

  • Figure 1: Firemen try to free workers buried under piles of concrete and metal girders. Photo: Claude-Michel Masson. Reproduced with permission of the photographer.

If your figure file includes text then please present the font as Ariel, Helvetica, or Verdana. This will mean that it matches the typeset text.

NOTE: All figures must be uploaded separately as supplementary files during the submission process, if possible in colour and at a resolution of at least 300dpi. Each file should not be more than 20MB. Standard formats accepted are: JPG, TIFF, GIF, PNG, EPS. For line drawings, please provide the original vector file (e.g. .ai, or .eps).

Tables
Tables must be created using a word processor's table function, not tabbed text.

Tables should be included in the manuscript. The final layout will place the tables as close to their first citation as possible.

All tables must be cited within the main text, numbered with Arabic numerals in consecutive order (e.g. Table 1, Table 2, etc.).

Each table must have an accompanying descriptive title. This should clearly and concisely summarise the content and/or use of the table. A short additional table legend is optional to offer a further description of the table. The table title and legend should be placed underneath the table.

Tables should not include:

  • Rotated text
  • Colour to denote meaning (it will not display the same on all devices)
  • Images
  • Vertical or diagonal lines
  • Multiple parts (e.g. ‘Table 1a’ and ‘Table 1b’). These should either be merged into one table, or separated into ‘Table 1’ and ‘Table 2’.

NOTE: If there are more columns than can fit on a single page, then the table will be placed horizontally on the page. If it still can't fit horizontally on a page, the table will be broken into two.

 

References


Reference format
This journal follows the Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edn (2010). 

  • Books & eBooks: 

If a book is available in more than one format (i.e. print, eBook), cite the version you consulted.

Material Type

Footnote example

Subsequent note entry

Bibliography example

Book: Single Author

11. Richard Read, Art and its Discontents: The Early Life of Adrian Stokes (Aldershot, England: Ashgate, 2002), 65.

25. Read, Art and its Discontents, 70.

Read, Richard. Art and its Discontents: The Early Life of Adrian Stokes. Aldershot, England: Ashgate, 2002.

Book: Two or three authors

 

 

 

8. Philip D. Goldswain, Hannah Lewi and Emma Williamson, Visualising the Architecture of Federation (Perth, WA: Curtin University of Technology and The National Council for the Centenary of Federation, 2001), 83.

 

*Authors are listed in the same order used on the title page for both the note and the bibliography.

 

 

 

 

12. Goldswain, Lewi and Williamson, Visualising the Architecture of Federation, 88.

 

 

 

 

 

Goldswain, Philip D., Hannah Lewi, and Emma Williamson. Visualising the Architecture of Federation. Perth, WA: Curtin University of Technology and The National Council for the Centenary of Federation, 2001.

 

* In the bibliography only the first author's name is inverted and a comma must appear before and after the first author's given name or initial

 

 

 

Book: Four or more authors

 

11. Christopher Vernon et al., The Griffin Legacy: Canberra, the Nation's Capital in the 21st Century (Canberra, ACT: National Capital Authority, 2004), 32.

*In the note, list only the first author, followed by et al. ("and others")

 

 

 

20. Vernon et al., The Griffin Legacy, 41.

 

 

 

 

Vernon, C., S. MacKenzie, I. Wood-Bradley, and D. Headon. The Griffin Legacy: Canberra, the Nation's Capital in the 21st Century. Canberra, ACT: National Capital Authority, 2004.

*Up to ten authors, list all the authors in the bibliography. If more than ten, list the first seven authors followed by 'et al.'.

 

 

 

Book: Two authors (eds) or more with same family name

1. Christopher Kendris and Theodore Kendris, 501 Spanish Verbs, 7th ed. (Hauppauge, NY: Barron’s Educational Series, 2010), 14.

 

 

 

4. Kendris and Kendris, 501 Spanish Verbs, 27–28.

 

 

Kendris, Christopher, and Theodore Kendris, 501 Spanish Verbs, 7th ed. (Hauppauge, NY: Barron’s Educational Series, 2010).

 

 

 

Book: multi-volume works

1. Muriel St. Clare Byrne, ed., The Lisle Letters (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1981), 4:243.

*The volume cited and page number are separated by a colon. In the short form the volume number does not need to be repeated.

For more examples go to the Chicago Manual of Style Online: Chapter 14. section 116 to 122.

 

Muriel St. Clare Byrne, ed., The Lisle Letters, 255.

 

 

 

Byrne, Muriel St. Clare, ed. The Lisle Letters. 6 vols. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1981

 

 

.

Book: No author

4. Stanze in lode della donna brutta (Florence, 1547), 13.

More examples: Chicago Manual of Style Online chapter 14 section 79,

 

 

7. Stanze in lode della donna, 14.

 

 

 

Stanze in lode della donna brutta. Florence, 1547.

 

 

Book: Editor, translator or compiler

2. Philip D. Goldswain and William Taylor eds., An everyday Transience: The Urban Imaginary of Goldfields Photographer John Joseph Dwyer (Perth, WA: UWA Publishing, 2010), 10.

 

 

11. Goldswain and Taylor, eds., An Everyday Transience, 7.

 

Goldswain, Philip D and William Taylor, eds. An Everyday Transience: The Urban Imaginary of Goldfields Photographer John Joseph Dwyer. Perth, WA: UWA Publishing, 2010.

 

 

Book: Editor, translator or compiler in addition to author

12. Heinz Rasch, Some Roots of Modern Architecture, trans. and ed. George Jelinek and Joan Jelinek (London: Tiranti, 1967), 20.

 

18. Heinz Rasch, Some Roots of Modern Architecture, 22.

Rasch, Heinz. Some Roots of Modern Architecture. Translated and edited by George Jelinek and Joan Jelinek. London: Tiranti, 1967.

 

Book: Author's name appears in title

9. Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, ed. John Bigelow (Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott, 1868), 233.

 

13. Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, 234.
 

Franklin, Benjamin. Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin.  Edited by John Bigelow. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott, 1868.

 

Book: Corporate or Organisation as author

8. Gehl Architects, Perth 2009 : Public Spaces and Public Life (Perth, WA: Department of Planning and Urban Development, 1994), 105.

 

12. Gehl Architects, Perth 2009, 107.

 

Gehl Architects. Perth 2009: Public Spaces and Public Life. Perth, WA: Department of Planning and Urban Developments, 1994.

 

Book: Government publication

5. Western Australian Department of Planning and Urban Development, Metropolitan Centres: Policy Statement for the Perth Metropolitan Region (Perth, W.A.: Department of Planning and Urban Development, 1991) 21.

 

 

9. Western Australian Department of Planning and Urban Development, Metropolitan Centres, 22.

Western Australian Department of Planning and Urban Development. Metropolitan Centres: Policy Statement for the Perth Metropolitan Region. Perth, W.A.: Department of Planning and Urban Development, 1991.

 

 

Book: Chapter or part of a book

3. Christopher Vernon and George Seddon, "Hacket and Annear: Laying the Foundations, "in A Landscape for Learning: A History of the Grounds of The University of Western Australia, ed. George Seddon and Gillian Lilleyman (Perth: University of Western Australia Press, 2006), 32-33.

 

 

 

 

6. Vernon and Seddon, "Hackett and Annear, "34.

 

 

 

 

 

Vernon, Christopher, and George Seddon. "Hackett and Annear: Laying the Foundations." In A Landscape for Learning: A History of the Grounds of The University of Western Australia, edited by George Seddon and Gillian Lilleyman, 30-35. Perth: University of Western Australia Press, 2006.

 

 

 

 

Book: Edition other than first

1. Quentin Beresford and Gary Partingon, Reform and resistance in aboriginal education: the Australian experience, rev.ed. (Perth: University of Western Australia Press, 2012), 55.

 

 

5. Beresford and Partington, Reform and Resistance, 57.

 

 

Beresford, Quentin, and Gary Partington. Reform and Resistance in Aboriginal Education: The Australian Experience. Rev. ed. Perth: University of Western Australia Press, 2012.

 

 

 

Book: Reprint editions

2. Albert Schweitzer, J. S. Bach. Translated by Ernest Newman. 2 vols. (1911. Reprint, New York: Dover, 1966), 53.

More examples about reprint and modern editions: Chicago Manual of Style Online chapter 14 section 114.

 

 

4. Schweizer, J. S. Bach, 67.

 

 

 

Schweitzer, Albert. J. S. Bach. Translated by Ernest Newman. 2 vols. 1911. Reprint, New York: Dover, 1966.

 

 

 

eBook

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Simon Unwin, Analysing Architecture (Hoboken: Taylor and Francis, 2009), http://uwa.eblib.com.au.ezproxy.edu.au/patron/ FullRecord.aspx?p=369114.

*For eBooks consulted online, list a URL; include an access date only if one is required by your discipline. If no fixed page numbers are available, you can include a section title or a chapter or other number.  See example below

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Unwin, Analysing Architecture, 22.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unwin, Simon. Analysing Architecture. Hoboken: Taylor and Francis, 2009. http://uwa.eblib.com.auezproxy.library.uwa.edu.au/patron/ FullRecord. aspx?p+369114.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

eBook Chapter no page numbers

1. Mark Evan Bonds, Absolute Music: The History of an Idea (New York: Oxford University Press, 2014), chap. 3, https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199343638.003.0004

* In the notes, the URLs are based on the DOIs for the chapters rather than the DOI for the work as a whole (as in the bibliography entry)  See: Chicago Manual of Style Online chapter 14 section 161.

4. Bonds, "Absolute Music".

Bonds, Mark Evan. Absolute Music: The History of an Idea. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199343638.001.0001

Dictionary / Encyclopaedia entry (print)

 

1. New Grove Dictionary of Opera, s.v. “Rake’s Progress, The” by Richard Taruskin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Grove Dictionary of Opera, s.v. “Rake’s Progress, The” by Richard Taruskin.

*“Well-known reference books, such as major dictionaries and encyclopedias, are normally cited in notes rather than in bibliographies. The facts of publication are often omitted, but the edition (if not the first) must be specified. References to an alphabetically arranged work cite the item (not the volume or page number) preceded by s.v. (sub verbo, “under the word”; pl. s.vv.)”

(Taken from The Chicago Manual of Style Online, Chapter 14, Section 232.)

 

Dictionary / Encyclopaedia entry (online)

1. New Grove Dictionary of Opera, s.v. “Rake’s Progress, The” by Richard Taruskin, accessed March 21, 2017, http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com.

 

 

 

New Grove Dictionary of Opera, s.v. “Rake’s Progress, The” by Richard Taruskin. Accessed March 21, 2017. http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com.

*See The Chicago Manual of Style Online, Chapter 14, Section 232.

 

Dictionary / Encyclopaedia (print) for substantial, authored entry

1. Robert Winter, Maurice Brown and Eric Sams, “Schubert, Franz,” in The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, ed. Stanley Sadie and John Tyrell (London: MacMillan, 2001), 22:656.

 

 

 

 

Winter, Robert, Maurice Brown and Eric Sams. “Schubert, Franz.” In The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, edited by Stanley Sadie and John Tyrell, vol. 22: 655-729. London: MacMillan, 2001.

 

*See The Chicago Manual of Style Online, Chapter 14, Section 232

 

Dictionary/Encyclopaedia entry (online) for substantial, authored entry

1. Robert Winter, Maurice Brown and Eric Sams, “Schubert, Franz,” in Grove Music Online (Oxford University Press), accessed March 21, 2017, http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com.ezproxy.library.uwa.edu.au/ subscriber/article/grove/music/25109.

 

 

 

 

Winter, Robert, Maurice Brown and Eric Sams. “Schubert, Franz.” In Grove Music Online. Oxford University Press. Accessed March 21, 2017. http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com.ezproxy.library.uwa.edu.au/ subscriber/article/grove/music/25109.

 

*See The Chicago Manual of Style Online, Chapter 14, Section 234.

  • Journal articles:

Material Type

Footnote Example

Journal Article in print

12. Philip Goldswain, "State Theatre Centre," Architecture Australia 100, no. 2 (2011): 54.

If the page numbering for a journal  is not continuous throughout a single volume, the short form should include the issue number in addition to the volume number. See Chicago Manual of Style Online chapter 14 section 185.

Journal article online (with a DOI)

19. Aimee Walshaw, "Accommodating Poverty: The Housing and Living Arrangements of the English Poor, C. 1600-1850," Housing Studies 27, no. 5 (2012): 726.
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02673037.2012.617922

Journal article online (with a URL and access date*)

 

 

5. Richard Read, "Vico, Virginia Woolf and Adrian Stoke's Autobiographies: Fantasy, Providence and Isolation in Post-War British Aesthetics," Art History 35, no. 4 (2012): 779, accessed September 5, 2013, http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db= aph&AN=78361910&site=ehost-live.

 

*Access dates are not usually required for journal articles unless no date of publication or revision can be determined from the source. However, some publishers or unit coordinators require an access date to be added, in which case, the access date should immediately precede the URL or DOI.  
See The Chicago Manual of Style Online, Chapter 14, Section 176.

 

Journal article online (from a database, no DOI or stable URL)

 

7. Simon Anderson, "Perth Arena," Architecture Australia 102, no.5 (2013): 35, Academic Search Premier.

*Include the name of the database or URL of journal article web page

 

 

  • Newspapers: 

Article from print newspaper

2. John Miles, “Crime Rate on the Rise in the Suburbs,” West Australian, Sept 23, 2016.

More information in The Chicago Manual of Style Online, Chapter 14, Section 191 -200.)

See also "Published interview" example in Personal Communications below.

Newspaper article online or from a database

1. Troy Bramston, "Oldest ANZAC Cove Memorial Returns," The Australian, Sept  10, 2014, https://global-factiva-com.ezproxy.library.uwa.edu.au/ha/default.aspx#./!?&_suid=150908938792205600957033914544

  • Internet/Websites:
Author, title of the page or post, title or owner of the site, date it was posted (if available), access date and URL.
 

Material Type

Footnote Example

Subsequent Note Entry

Bibliography Example

Webpage

15.  Keith Schneider, “Salt Lake City is Finding a Payoff in Conservation,” New York Times, November 7, 2007, accessed June 13, 2016, http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/07/business/ businessspecial3/07cities.htm.

 * Include a publication date or modification as well as an access date. If no publication date or modification date can be determined include access date.

 

 

 

 

Schneider, Keith.  “Salt Lake City is Finding a Payoff in Conservation.” New York Times, November 7, 2007. Accessed June 13, 2016.  http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/07/business/ businessspecial3/07cities.htm.

 

 

 

Webpage: No Author

8. "History of the Library and collections," Royal British Association of Architects, accessed April 4, 2013, http://www.architecture.com./LibraryDrawings AndPhotographs/RIBALibrary/History.aspx.

 

 

16. Royal British Association of Architects, "History of the Library and collections."

 

Royal British Association of Architects. "History of the Library and collections." Accessed April 4, 2013.  http:www.architecture.com/Library DrawingsAndPhotographs/RIBALibrary/History.aspx.

 

 

Webpage: No Date

12. "Weaver Hawkins," Design & Art Australia Online, last modified April 4, 2013,
http://www.daao.org.au/bio/weaver-hawkins/.

 

 

17. Design & Art Australia Online, "Weaver Hawkins."

 

Design & Art Australia Online. "Weaver Hawkins." Last modified April 4, 2013.
http://www.daao.org.au/bio/weaver-hawkins/.

 

 

Blog

 

4. Tamara Winikoff, "Visual artists' fees: what is the status of artists in Australia?," The NAVA Blog, November 9, 2013,
http://www.visualarts.net.au/navablogs/artistfees-artshub0.

 

* Add the word blog in brackets after the name of the blog (unless the word blog is part of the name) 

Winikoff, "Visual artists' fees."

 

 

 

Winikoff, Tamara. "Visual artists' fees: what is the status of artists in Australia?" The NAVA Blog. November 9, 2013.
http://www.visualarts.net.au/navablogs/artistfees-artshub0.

 

 

 

Facebook page

3. Tony Abbott's Facebook page, accessed July 25, 2013,
http://www.facebook.com/TonyAbbottMP.

24. Abbott, Facebook page.

Tony Abbott's Facebook page. Accessed July 25, 2013. https://www.
facebook.com/TonyAbbottMP.

Facebook post

1. Junot Díaz, “Always surprises my students when I tell them that the ‘real’ medieval was more diverse than the fake ones most of us consume,” Facebook, February 24, 2016, https://www.facebook.com/junotdiaz.writer/posts/972495572815454.

13. Díaz, Facebook post.

Díaz, Junot. “Always surprises my students when I tell them that the ‘real’ medieval was more diverse than the fake ones most of us consume,” Facebook, February 24, 2016, https://www.facebook.com/junotdiaz.writer/posts/972495572815454.

Twitter profile

32. UWA news, Twitter page, accessed September 14, 2011, https://twitter.com/uwanews.

 

34. UWA news, Twitter page.

 

UWA news Twitter page. Accessed September 14, 2011.
http://twitter.com/uwanews.

 

Twitter post ('tweet')

2. Conan O’Brien (@ConanOBrien), “In honor of Earth Day, I’m recycling my tweets,” Twitter, April 22, 2015, 11:10 a.m., https://twitter.com/ConanOBrien/status/590940792967016448.

 

15. O'Brien, Twitter post.

 

O'Brien, Conan (@ConanOBrien). “In honor of Earth Day, I’m recycling my tweets,” Twitter, April 22, 2015, 11:10 a.m., https://twitter.com/ConanOBrien/status/590940792967016448.

 

Online video (YouTube)

32. “Horowitz TV Interview 1977,” filmed March 1977, YouTube Video, 14:58, posted by “goodmanmusica,” August 2010, http://youtu.be/eZm7OW3ufbc.

 

“Horowitz TV Interview 1977.” Filmed March 1977. YouTube Video, 14:58. Posted by “goodmanmusica,” August 2010. http://youtu.be/eZm7OW3ufbc.

  • Images and Tables:

You can put the information in a caption near the image or in a footnote.  (Images are not usually listed in a bibliography).

Material Type

Footnote Example

Image: Print

5. Georgia O'Keeffe, The Cliff Chimney, 1938, Milwaukee Art Museum, in Barbara Buhler Lynes, Lesley Poling-Kempes, and Frederick W. Turner, Georgia O'Keeffe and New Mexico: A sense of place (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2004), 25.

Image: Online

6.  Georgia O’Keeffe, The Cliff Chimney, 1938, oil on canvas, 36 x 30", Milwaukee Art Museum, accessed August 10, 2016, https://gokmrc.wordpress.com/2014/09/22/ a-hike-at-ghost-ranch/.

Table

1. Reid Ewing and Otto Clemente, Measuring urban design: Metrics for livable places (Washington: Island Press, 2013), 65, table 4.1.

  • Conference papers and proceedings:

 

Material Type

Footnote Example

Conference Proceeding Paper: Print

12. Philip D. Goldswain, "Prospecting: photography and the manufactured landscapes of Kalgoorlie," in XX111 Annual Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand,  ed. Terrance McMinn, John Stephens, and Steve Basson (Fremantle, WA: Society of Architectural Historians Australia & New Zealand, 2006), 173-177.

 

 

 

Conference Proceeding Paper: Electronic

19. Philip H. Bay, "Social and environmental dimensions in ecologically sustainable design: towards a methodology of ranking levels of social interactions in semi-open and open spaces in dense residential environments in Singapore," in Subtropical Cities 2011: Subtropical Urbanism Beyond Climate Change, (Florida: Florida Atlantic, 2011), 162-176, accessed September 19, 2017,http://www.subtropicalcitites2011.com/pdf2/162%20Bay.pdf.

 

 

  • Multimedia formats & Software:

 

Material Type

In-Text Citation

DVD

1. Tom Gibbons, Tom Gibbons: 1998 LWAG and Artplace expos, directed by Miriam Stannage (Perth, WA: Mirian Stannage, 1998), DVD.

 

Sound recording (composer emphasis)

1. Igor Stravinsky, Symphony of Psalms; Mass; Canticum Sacrum, with Westminster Cathedral Choir and City of London Sinfonia, conducted by James O’Donnel, recorded June 18-20, November 29, 1990, Hyperion CDA66437, 1991, compact disc.

Sound recording (performer emphasis)

1. Sara Macliver (soprano) and Sally-Anne Russell (mezzo-soprano), with Orchestra of the Antipodes and Antony Walker (conductor), Baroque Duets, ABC Classics 476 7737, 2005, compact disc.

Track from a sound recording

1. Miles Davis, “So What,” on Kind of Blue, Columbia CK 64935, 1997, compact disc.

 

Sound recording (online)

1. Johannes Brahms, Clarinet Sonatas, Kalman Berkes (clarinet) and Jeno Jando (piano), Naxos 8.553121, streaming audio, http://uwa.naxosmusiclibrary.com.ezproxy.library.uwa.edu.au/ catalogue/item.asp?cid=8.553121.

Liner notes from a sound recording

1. Igor Stravinsky, Symphony of Psalms; Mass; Canticum Sacrum, with Westminster Cathedral Choir and City of London Sinfonia, conducted by James O’Donnel, recorded June 18-20, November 29, 1990, Hyperion CDA66437, 1991, compact disc, Liner notes by Ivan Moody.

  • Music Scores:

Material Type

Footnote Example

Music Scores (print)

15. Aaron Copland, Concerto, Clarinet and String Orchestra (with Harp and Piano), Reduction for Clarinet and Piano (New York: Boosey & Hawkes, 1950), 10.

Music Scores (online)

15. Johannes Brahms, Clarinet Sonata No.1 in F Minor, Op. 120, No.1, ed. Hans Gál (Germany: Breitkopf and Härtel, 1895), 3. https://search.alexanderstreet.com.ezproxy.library.uwa.edu.au/view/ work/bibliographic_entity|score_movement|464771.

Music Scores (unpublished manuscript)

15. Johann Sebastian Bach, "Was mir behagt, ist nur die muntre Jagd!", BWV 208, ca. 1720-1739, D-B Mus. ms. Bach P 42, Faszikel 3, Preußischer Kulturbesitz, Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin, last modified 22 August 2017, https://www.bach-digital.de/receive/BachDigitalSource_source_00000866.

 

  • Lecture Notes: 

Material Type

Footnote Example

Lecture Notes

15. Nigel Westbrook, "Le Corbusier and Modern Architecture" (lecture, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, April 18, 2007).

  • Theses:

Material Type

Footnote Example

Thesis: Unpublished in print

 

5. John J. Taylor, "Joseph John Talbot Hobbs (1864-1938): and his Australian-English architecture" (Ph. D., University of Western Australia, 2009), 34-35.

 

 

 

Thesis: Unpublished electronic copy

10. Annette Nina Condello, "Luxury and architecture : from ancient Sybaris to the early twentieth century" (Ph.D., University of Western Australia, 2009), 25,
http://repository.uwa.edu.au:80/R/-?func=dbin-jump-
full&object_id=13042&silo_library=GEN01


  • Personal Communication:

Material Type

Footnote Example

Email

11. Joe Bloggs, “Architecture today”, e-mail to author, September 20, 2015.

16.  Pauline Smith, e-mail message to author, December 8, 2014.

 

Interview: by Author

12.  Janet Andrews (principal adviser, Invest Architects), in discussion with the author, July 2013.

 

Interview: published

8.  Donald E. Felsinger, “Turning Energy Uncertainty into Opportunity,” interviewed by Clifford Krauss.  New York Times, May 3, 2008, late edition, sec. C.

"An interview that has been published or broadcast or made available online can usually be treated like an article or other item in a periodical. Interviews consulted online should include a URL or similar identifier."

See The Chicago Manual of Style Online, Chapter 14, Section 213.

  • Citing information someone else has cited:

Secondary Citation

Citing a secondary source is generally discouraged, since authors are expected to have examined the works they cite. If an original source is unavailable both the original and the secondary source must be listed in the footnote,but only the original should appear in the bibliography.

Footnote:

  1. Louis Zukofsky, "Sincerity and Objectification," Poetry 37 (February 1931): 277, quoted in Bonnie Costello, Marianne Moore: Imaginary Possessions (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1981), 78

Bibliography:

Costelllo, Bonnie, Marianne Moore: Imaginary Possessions. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 198
  • Using short form of citations and ibid.

Shortened citations 

Subsequent citations already given in full should be shortened in footnotes whenever possible.  The short form should include enough information to remind the reader of the full title or to lead them to appropriate entry in the bibliography. 

e.g.        2. Fabio Schillaci, Architectural Renderings: construction and design manual (Chichester: West Sussex: Wiley, 2010), 120. (First time cited in footnotes).

              3. Schillaci, Architectural renderings, 251.

              4. Schillaci, 257.

              5. Richard Read, Art and its Discontents: The Early Life of Adrian Stokes (Aldershot, England: Ashgate, 2002), 65.

              6. Schillaci, Architectural renderings, 258.

See The Chicago Manual of Style Online, Chapter 14, Section 34.

Using Ibid.

In previous editions of the manual (16th edition and earlier) the abbreviation ibid. (abbreviated from the Latin "ibidem" which means "in the same place") was used to cite the same source and page number(s) from a single source two or more times consecutively.  If you use the same source but a different page number, the corresponding note uses ibid followed by a comma and the new page number(s).

The 17th edition discourages the use of Ibid in favour of shortened citations. 

e.g.         6. Fabio Schillaci, Architectural Renderings: construction and design manual (Chichester: West Sussex: Wiley, 2010), 120. (First time cited in footnotes).

               7. Schillaci, Architectural renderings, 251.

               8. Ibid., 271-273.

               9. Ibid.

              10. Ibid., 450.

              11. Richard Read, Art and its Discontents: The Early Life of Adrian Stokes (Aldershot, England: Ashgate, 2002), 65.

              12. Schillaci, Architectural renderings, 277.


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